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Author Topic: Back of the neck finish  (Read 90375 times)
RonenTat
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« on: June 12, 2010, 04:25:49 AM »

Hey fellow Sadowholics, I need an advice. The back of my fretless neck becomes a bit sticky after couple of minuets being played. No matter how often I wipe it down with the bluetiful cloth, it always comes back. It doesn't happen at all with my other two Sad's. The finish looks the same but behaves differently. Any ideas?
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dragonbass
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« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2010, 03:31:52 PM »

 You can try using 0000 steel wool to "break" the finish a bit. just rub it very lightly (a few passes will do)or you will eventually go through the nitro finish. Also if you use the steel wool, please place masking tape over your pickups so none of it attaches to the magnets.

                                  Robert
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RonenTat
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« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2010, 03:53:35 PM »

Thanks Rob, I try that next week.
The bass is a killer, a P/J combination Ebony board and now with TI flats. Amazing tone and feel. I love the P pickup in passive mode with a little VTC cut.
And it's your name on the backplate, what do you know...! Thanks man.
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Sadowsky
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« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2010, 02:04:28 PM »

I would go even courser than 0000 steel wool.  I would lightly sand it with some 280 or 320 stearate sandpaper, just enough to cut the gloss.

Roger
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RonenTat
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« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2010, 02:32:32 PM »

Just happened to have a 320 sandpaper at home. Took me 2 minuets... totally different feel, much smoother with no sticky feeling. Great!
Thanks Roger !!  Smiley
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Vic
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« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2010, 10:19:24 AM »

I would go even courser than 0000 steel wool.  I would lightly sand it with some 280 or 320 stearate sandpaper, just enough to cut the gloss.

Roger
From what I understand, you use a fairly thin finish on your necks, because you feel the sooner it "breaks in" (which i assume to mean exposing the actual wood surface), the better.

My question is, would sanding it like this essentially take the finish pretty much off after maybe even just a couple times doing this?
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Vic
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Legion
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« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2010, 10:24:35 AM »

I am also wondering how many times it's safe to perform this before you take the nitro off completely.

I've tried rubbing my neck down lightly with 0000 grade steel wool first, which made a small improvement.
I then used 320 stearated paper as per Rogers suggestion. This made a real difference and really cut through the gloss, leaving the neck with a really satin feeling to the finish.

But it's starting to feel a little sticky again already. It's a little like bits of sticky gunk start to ball up under my thumb in certain areas, I can actually rub them together and then rub them off - so I'm considering doing it again but if I continue at this rate I imagine it will be down to the bare wood pretty quickly. Maybe I should just take it down to the wood and use an oil to protect the back of the neck?
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Sadowsky
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« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2010, 10:30:37 AM »

I would not do anything to discourage you from sanding the finish off the playing area on the neck and applying a good oil.  The best is a gunstock oil called Tru-Oil.  Not sure if you can get it in the UK.

Roger


I am also wondering how many times it's safe to perform this before you take the nitro off completely.

I've tried rubbing my neck down lightly with 0000 grade steel wool first, which made a small improvement.
I then used 320 stearated paper as per Rogers suggestion. This made a real difference and really cut through the gloss, leaving the neck with a really satin feeling to the finish.

But it's starting to feel a little sticky again already. It's a little like bits of sticky gunk start to ball up under my thumb in certain areas, I can actually rub them together and then rub them off - so I'm considering doing it again but if I continue at this rate I imagine it will be down to the bare wood pretty quickly. Maybe I should just take it down to the wood and use an oil to protect the back of the neck?
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Legion
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« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2010, 03:16:16 PM »

I would not do anything to discourage you from sanding the finish off the playing area on the neck and applying a good oil.  The best is a gunstock oil called Tru-Oil.  Not sure if you can get it in the UK.

Roger
Thanks for confirming my options Roger. I've managed to order some Tru-Oil over here fairly easily. I think I'll keep using the 320 grit as required and if it gets down to the wood I'll apply the oil. It's given me a warm feeling to have a contingency plan  Smiley
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P. Bass
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« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2011, 04:11:17 PM »

I would not do anything to discourage you from sanding the finish off the playing area on the neck and applying a good oil.  The best is a gunstock oil called Tru-Oil.  Not sure if you can get it in the UK.

Roger


I am also wondering how many times it's safe to perform this before you take the nitro off completely.

I've tried rubbing my neck down lightly with 0000 grade steel wool first, which made a small improvement.
I then used 320 stearated paper as per Rogers suggestion. This made a real difference and really cut through the gloss, leaving the neck with a really satin feeling to the finish.

But it's starting to feel a little sticky again already. It's a little like bits of sticky gunk start to ball up under my thumb in certain areas, I can actually rub them together and then rub them off - so I'm considering doing it again but if I continue at this rate I imagine it will be down to the bare wood pretty quickly. Maybe I should just take it down to the wood and use an oil to protect the back of the neck?

Is there any downside to NOT applying the oil to the bare maple? ( ex: moisture - I have to deal w/ lots of humidity fluctuation). Is the nitro all that relevant as a moisture barrier or otherwise protective?  If I take off the nitro, I would prefer to let the bare wood buff to a "surface" and leave it at that. Thanks.
B.
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Sadowsky
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« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2011, 09:01:14 PM »

The only downside is possibly more "greying" of the raw maple from hand dirt.  Nitro only has about a 15% effectiveness as a moisture barrier so you are not giving anything up by removing the finish.

Roger
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P. Bass
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« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2011, 09:30:10 PM »

The only downside is possibly more "greying" of the raw maple from hand dirt.  Nitro only has about a 15% effectiveness as a moisture barrier so you are not giving anything up by removing the finish.

Roger

Thanks for your response Roger. I know you're busy at the moment pal.
Greying of the maple isn't an issue w/ me. I've seen some pretty impressive "greyed" maple. I've been wanting to "undress" the playing area, :^) , for some time & couldn't pull the trigger. This isn't a neck that can be swapped out & THIS one is just too dear to me to have it be anything but optimum. I've been waiting a lifetime for this P-Bass.  SO - off comes the nitro. 
Bought some 3M "sandblaster" 320 & 400 paper & will back it w/ a square of "scotchbrite" pad to keep a formed shape over the neck. Since mine has no tint in the nitro, I'll be extra careful to watch for fibre as I break through. I think a test buff will probably reveal any remaining nitro as I finish up.
I am VERY excited about the intended outcome. May take another few days to get underway but will report in due course. Your new home is taking shape REAL nice Roger. More to ya.
Blair.
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Sadowsky
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« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2011, 09:48:52 PM »

I would sand with 220 to remove the finish and then 320 after that.  Then dampen the wood with a damp paper towel which will raise the grain a bit.  After it dries, sand it again with the 320 followed by 400 and you are done.

Roger
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P. Bass
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« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2011, 09:58:12 PM »

I would sand with 220 to remove the finish and then 320 after that.  Then dampen the wood with a damp paper towel which will raise the grain a bit.  After it dries, sand it again with the 320 followed by 400 and you are done.

Roger

Thanks for that Roger. Will do. 220 scares me a tad but I'll take care. "Whiskering" was my plan as well. lol.  Is there a process to "seal" or "surface" the maple when done or just let it finish by playing?  
Blair.
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Sadowsky
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« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2011, 10:00:21 PM »

The only "seal" would be a coat of Tru-Oil or other gunstock oil.

Roger
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